Saturday, October 21, 2017

IADAB News Weekly - Edition 5: Biogas Powered Fuel Cell Emissions Approval, UK ADBA and RHI Renewal, Plus Biochar Synergies

The IADAB Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas News Weekly - Issue 5: 20 October 2017

This is Issue 5 of the IADAB News Weekly where we summarise the most important news of the week in the developing world of the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry in the UK and globally.

IF YOU WANT A SUMMARY OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER WATCH THE FOLLOWING VIDEO. OTHERWISE SCROLL DOWN TO READ THE MORE DETAILED VERSION.


The most popular news this week has been that a US fuel cell Energy Power Plant using on-site anaerobic digester gas, has achieved Certification from the California Air Resources Board Distributed Generation (DG) Clean Air Standards certification authority, and is good news for the future wide-scale adoption of large scale fuel cells for biogas energy electrical conversion.

Second on our list has been the article by ADBA pointing out to the UK government that, following the publication of their strategy document last week, "anaerobic digestion can underpin the UK's Clean Growth Strategy". The fine words made in the strategy, now creates the need for urgent tabling of legislation on the Renewable Heat Incentive to renew support for biomethane-to-grid.

Our third article this week, is chosen for running third in the popularity stakes on Facebook, and holds an unusual subject for the AD industry, this being; Synergies between Anaerobic Digestion and Biochar

Apparently carbonizing the anaerobically digested fibers could be a viable way to create adsorbent for the removal of soluble phosphorous from Anaerobic digesters effluents.  

The IBI Educational Webinar will discuss using biochar in the AD substrate to boost not only the quantity but also the quality of the methane produced.  It is also claimed that the biochar can reduce the H2S generated during the AD process thereby reducing wear and tear on equipment.

IADAB News Weekly
Finally, we reference two articles in the "also of interest" category for biogas plant opaerators especially, on the subject of whether or not microbial communities in an anaerobic bioreactor change with continuous feeding sludge into a full-scale anaerobic digestion system. Personally, the author would be surprised if they don't evolve in our modern mechanical digesters.

Now we suggest that you scroll down and read further about these subjects:

1. FuelCell Energy SureSource Power Plant Using On-Site Anaerobic Digester Gas Achieves Certification for California Air Resources Board Distributed Generation (DG) Clean Air Standards

This certification acknowledges the clean air profile of SureSource solutions, facilitating the air permitting process, which reduces costs and supports client sustainability goals.
FuelCell Energy design, manufacture, undertake project development, install, operate and maintain megawatt-scale fuel cell systems, serving utilities, industrial and large municipal power users with solutions that include both utility-scale and on-site power generation, carbon capture, local hydrogen production for transportation and industry, and long duration energy storage. With SureSource™ installations on three continents and millions of megawatt hours of ultra-clean power produced, FuelCell Energy is a global leader with environmentally responsible power solutions.

Copyright www.fuelcellenergy.com
Municipal wastewater treatment applications for the SureSource solution are based on a comprehensive approach that enables the municipality to outsource the operation and maintenance of the fuel cell power plant as well as biogas treatment, which is also provided by FuelCell Energy using the company’s proprietary technology for biogas treatment and fuel quality monitoring. The versatile SureSource solution can utilize on-site renewable biogas or directed biogas as a fuel source and is the only fuel cell or other type of power generation technology to gain CARB certification to the 2013 Waste Gas standard using on-site biogas.

SureSource power plants are uniquely suited for operation utilizing on-site biogas since the system is able to use the low-Btu gas without a de-rating of power plant output, and the power plants produce usable thermal energy which can support the digester operation. Power produced by the system can be used on site or sold to the electric utility under tariffs such as California’s BioMAT feed in tariff. A modification of the technology is available in which the power plant produces vehicle-grade renewable hydrogen in addition to power and heat, supporting the developing infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles.

“We have gained extensive experience working with a number of municipal water treatment facilities": said Frank Wolak, Vice President Sales-Americas. via FuelCell Energy SureSource Power

2. PRESS RELEASE: Anaerobic Digestion Can Underpin Clean Growth Strategy - Urgent RHI Renewal Needed – ADBA

The Anaerobic Digestion & Bioresources Association (ADBA) has welcomed the Clean Growth Strategy published by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and said that anaerobic digestion (AD) can play an underpinning role in meeting the strategy’s goals.

ADBA Chief Executive Charlotte Morton said:
"The multi-faceted nature of AD means that, with the right support, it can play a central role in decarbonising heat, electricity, transport, and farming, as well as increasing energy and food security and restoring the UK’s degraded soils. No other technology can make such a key contribution to so many different areas of the Clean Growth Strategy."
We welcome the government’s ambition to divert all food waste from landfill by 2030 and to support local authorities in rolling out separate food waste collections.

IADAB News Weekly Issue: 5 The Clean Growth Strategy publication cover image.


We look forward to BEIS’s new Resources & Waste Strategy, which will need to be supported by meaningful funding and legislation to effect the scale of change needed for an urgent transition to a more circular economy.

We also welcome the strategy’s highlighting of the importance of best practice in AD. ADBA’s pioneering, industry-led Best Practice Scheme, which will be launched in full later this year, will help support AD operators in meeting the highest environmental, health and safety, and operational standards.

The publication of the Clean Growth Strategy today is a welcome sign that the government is starting to think about how we can make the deep emissions cuts that will be necessary to meet the Fourth and Fifth Carbon Budgets over the next 15 years. 

What is needed now is tangible support for AD in the form of the following:

Urgent tabling of legislation on the Renewable Heat Incentive to renew support for biomethane-to-grid;
  1. A long-term replacement for the Feed-In Tariff to support small-scale renewable electricity generation;
  2. Mandatory separate food waste collections in England to allow AD to recycle this vital and underused resource; and
  3. A new support system for farmers that rewards carbon abatement and incentivises the use of biofertiliser to restore soils.
For further information contact Chris Noyce, PR & Parliamentary Affairs Executive: 020 3176 5441 / chris.noyce@adbioresources.org - via PRESS RELEASE: Anaerobic digestion can underpin Clean Growth Strategy – ADBA 

3. IBI Educational Webinar Series: Synergies between Anaerobic Digestion and Biochar

Research has shown that there are many synergies to be found integrating pyrolysis and gasification with anaerobic digestion (AD) systems.  Carbonizing the anaerobic digested fibers could be a viable way to create adsorbent for the removal of soluable phosphorous from Anaerobic digesters effluents.

Using biochar in the AD substrate can boost not only the quantity but the quality of the methane (CH4) produced.  It can also reduce the H2S generated during the AD process thereby reducing wear and tear on equipment.  In the webinar we will discuss the possibilities to integrate acidic biochars with dissolved air flotation systems for ammonia removal. 

The focus of this webinar is on pyrolysis and gasification, two technologies that are capable of converting the digested fibers into a bio-char, and that can be integrated with AD.  

During the presentation Dr. Garcia-Perez will also discuss some of the potential uses of these chars in anaerobic digestion systems.

The webinar on October 30, 2017 • 3:30 – 5:00 pm ET, costs $40 to attend, via IBI Educational Webinar Series: Synergies between Anaerobic Digestion & Biochar

You may also be interested in the following:

1. Adaptation of Methanogenic Inocula to Anaerobic Digestion of Maize Silage. via Adaptation of Methanogenic Inocula to Anaerobic Digestion of Maize Silage.

2. Do microbial communities in an anaerobic bioreactor change with continuous feeding sludge into a full-scale anaerobic digestion system? via Do microbial communities in an anaerobic bioreactor change with continuous feeding sludge into a full-scale anaerobic digestion system?

Monday, October 16, 2017

How to Feed a Digester Weltec MultiMix - Better Biogas Yield and Stability



How to Feed a Digester for High Biogas Output Weltec MULTIMix 
Visit: http://blog.anaerobic-digestion.com/weltec-biopower-extends-ad-plant-france/
How to Feed a Digester for High Biogas Output The Weltec MULTIMix Way.

Avoid problems with inconsistent throughout quality, and avoid downtime when feeding a digester with, grass silage, whole-plant silage, and manure for biogas production.

With the MULTIMix digester feed delivery system, WELTEC BIOPOWER offers, a unique solution which removes foreign materials, BEFORE being conveyed to the feed pump.

The system also shreds the substrate to a size and consistency which is optimised, for rapid uptake by the biogas bacteria.

The MULTIMix system thus ensures the technical and economic stability of biogas plants, by preventing failures, and thus ensuring an uninterrupted process of digestion of the substrates used.

Advantages of Installing a Weltec MULTIMix:

1, Processes fibrous, sticky and soft substrates (up to a high dry weight percentage).
2, Provides bacteria-oriented substrate shredding for immediate biogas production.
3, Ensures an optimum loading of the digester with a homogeneous, macerated bio-suspension.
4, Minimises the risk of floating and sediment layers.
5, Improves overall anaerobic digestion plant energy efficiency, through the reduction of agitation energy needed, and significantly increases the pump feed pump's typical service life.
which substantially reduces wear and tear.

Two quick MULTIMix tips, for biogas plant operators, follow:

Tip 1, Several digesters can be fed with only one MULTIMix.
Tip 2, A MULTIMix unit can easily be retrofitted to your biogas plant.

Video based on the Weltec MULTIMix web page at www.weltec-biopower.com

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CLICK HERE: http://blog.anaerobic-digestion.com/weltec-biopower-extends-ad-plant-france/

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More Information about Feed Digester:

Feedstocks | Anaerobic Digestion
www.biogas-info.co.uk/about/feedstocks/
The material that is used in anaerobic digestion is called feedstock. What goes into a digester determines what comes out, so careful choice of feedstocks is ...

Digester Feed Products - Vogelsang USA
www.vogelsangusa.com/products/digester-feed-products/?L=1
Biogas technology needs to be secure and efficient at all times to enable cost-effective plant operation. Digester feeding plays a key role here. Wet feeding is the ...

[PDF]“Design & Analysis of an Anaerobic Digester to Feed a Biogas Fuelled ...
research.ncl.ac.uk/pro-tem/components/pdfs/material.../Butcher_Design&analysis.pdf
19 Aug 2010 - “Design & Analysis of an Anaerobic Digester to Feed a. Biogas Fuelled Boiler for a Medium Sized. Industrial Enterprise”. Matthew Butcher.

Biogas - Digester Feed Material
www.biogassa.co.za/index.php/biogassa-blog/112-digester-feed
Anaerobic digestion - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaerobic_digestion
Anaerobic digestion is a collection of processes by which microorganisms break down ..... The residence time in a digester varies with the amount and type of feed material, and with the configuration of the digestion system. In a typical two-stage ...

Silage - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silage
Silage is fermented, high-moisture stored fodder which can be fed to cattle, sheep and other such ruminants (cud-chewing animals) or used as a biofuel feedstock for anaerobic digesters. .... The advantages of silage as animal feed are several: During fermentation, the silage bacteria act on the cellulose and carbohydrates in ...

Digestate - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digestate
Digestate is the material remaining after the anaerobic digestion of a biodegradable feedstock. Anaerobic digestion produces two main products: digestate and ...

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Friday, October 13, 2017

IADAB News Weekly - Edition 4: Clean Energy Growth Strategy to Estonian Biogas State Support

The IADAB Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas News Weekly - Issue 4: 13 October 2017

This is Issue 4 of the IADAB News Weekly where we summarise the most important news of the week in the developing world of the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry in the UK and globally!

IF YOU WANT A SUMMARY OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER WATCH THE FOLLOWING VIDEO. OTHERWISE SCROLL DOWN TO READ THE MORE DETAILED VERSION.


We are a UK based newsletter, so this week we start with the biggest story for UK readers. This is the publication of the UK Government's Clean Growth Strategy, which is being seen as unequivocally good news for the UK AD and Biogas industry. 

Then we follow that, in Item 2, with news from IKEA, the all-conquering European home store business. IKEA this week announced that it will support the development of biomethane service stations in Finland, indicating a huge leap forward for renewable transport fuel use. Where Finland leads others will surely soon follow.

In item 3, the Finnish are in the news again. Scroll down for a news story "double" from Puregas Solutions, who whilst becoming the UK North East's fastest growing company, have also just been acquired by Finnish company Wärtsilä: The self-proclaimed; "global leader in advanced technologies and complete life-cycle solutions for the marine and energy markets".

Finally, as if, just to confirm the ascendancy of anaerobic digestion and biogas Europe-wide, is the news that Estonian companies will soon be able to begin applying for state subsidies for the production of biomethane,

So, in a week that once again has been good news for the industry, let’s get started…

Item 1: UK Clean Growth Strategy Welcomed by ADBA – But Food Waste Collections Needed

UK readers will be presently surprised that, contrary to what the mainstream UK media would have you believe. The government under leader Theresa May, is not totally paralysed by Brexit negotiations, but is making domestic policy, with the publication of the UK Clean Growth Strategy.

The organisation’s Chief Executive, Charlotte Morton said:
“The multi-faceted nature of AD means that, with the right support, Anaerobic Digestion can play a central role in decarbonising heat, electricity, transport, and farming, as well as recycling organic wastes, increasing energy and food security, and restoring the UK’s degraded soils. No other technology can make such a key contribution to so many different areas of the Clean Growth Strategy."
“We welcome the government’s ambition to divert all food waste from landfill by 2030 and to support local authorities in rolling out separate food waste collections. We look forward to BEIS’s new Resources and Waste Strategy, which will need to be supported by meaningful funding and legislation to effect the scale of change needed for an urgent transition to a more circular economy."
“We also welcome the strategy’s highlighting of the importance of best practice in AD. ADBA’s pioneering, industry-led Best Practice Scheme, which will be launched in full later this year, will help support AD operators in meeting the highest environmental, health and safety, and operational standards."
“The publication of the Clean Growth Strategy today is a welcome sign that the government is starting to think about how we can make the deep emissions cuts that will be necessary to meet the Fourth and Fifth Carbon Budgets over the next 15 years.
What is needed now is tangible support for AD in the form of the following:
  • Urgent tabling of legislation on the Renewable Heat Incentive to renew support for biomethane-to-grid;
  • A long-term replacement for the Feed-In Tariff to support small-scale renewable electricity generation;
  • Mandatory separate food waste collections in England to allow AD to recycle this vital and underused resource; and
  • A new support system for farmers that rewards carbon abatement and incentivises the use of biofertiliser to restore soils.”
via UK Clean Growth Strategy Welcomed by ADBA – But Food Waste Collections Needed

Item 2: IKEA Supports Development of Biomethane Service Stations in Finland

Gasum has signed a comprehensive circular economy cooperation agreement with IKEA Finland.

UK Clean Energy Growth Strategy to Estonian Biogas article image.


The cooperation will involve using food waste from IKEA restaurants in Finland to produce biogas, with Gasum filling stations also to be constructed in conjunction with IKEA stores. The first station will be opened at the IKEA store in Espoo in late 2017. The Finnish IKEA stores will be the first IKEA units in the world to get natural gas stations.

“Utilizing the volumes of food waste remaining after our efforts to eliminate wastage is a sustainable act for the promotion of a clean energy form, biogas. As a company we’re determined to set a good example by adopting new circular-economy approaches and hopefully at the same time inspiring consumers as well as other companies to take concrete environmental action,” 
said, Country Sustainability Manager Tiina Suvanto from IKEA Finland. via IKEA supports development of biomethane stations in Finland

Item 3: Wärtsilä to Acquire Biogas Upgrader - Puregas Solutions Who Also Receive Status of UK NE Region's Fastest Growing Company


(Image: By Adrian Pingstone (talk · contribs) (Self-photographed) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The company utilizes the unique CApure process to convert raw biogas to biomethane and renewable natural gas. The CApure process recovers more than 99.9% of the biomethane present in the raw biogas. The process separates the CO2 from the biogas by a process ... via Wärtsilä to acquire biogas upgrader Puregas Solutions

The technology enables the company to upgrade raw biogas to biomethane/Renewable Natural Gas for direct injection into the gas grid, compression for vehicle fuelling (bioCNG) or liquefied to provide bioLNG (liquefied natural gas) ... via Sunderland's Puregas Solutions named North East's fastest growing company

Item 4: Estonian Government to Give State Support to Biomethane

Estonian companies will be able to begin applying for state subsidies for the production of biomethane, according to ERR news.

Estonia’s goal is for fuel produced from renewable sources to make up 10% of total fuel consumption by 2020, of which biomethane would account for one third. The measure aimed at boosting the use of Estonian made, environment-friendly biomethane will be financed with proceeds from the auctioning of carbon dioxide emission credits... via Estonian government to give state support to biomethane 

So, the message to the AD and Biogas industry this week is to plan for expansion, ahead of many new opportunities likely to flow from the news of this last week...

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Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Remarkable Uses for Sewage Sludge Including Producing Biogas

What could possibly be the use for all that mucky filthy smelly sewage sludge? 
NEVERTHELESS, We found some remarkable uses for Sewage Sludge, Including producing biogas. 

Sewage sludge, which is the by-product of the treatment of our foul sewage in wastewater treatment works on first sight would seem to be a useless material, but is it? We set out to find out, and the result is this article. Scroll down to see that.

Meanwhile maybe you would like to watch our video about the specific use which is listed below: "Remarkable uses for Sewage Sludge, Including producing biogas". enjoy the video!


1. Hygienize It and Spread It on Land: 

If spread on land it will raise soil-available phosphorous says Wikipedia (see below). That's a good outcome for the growth of crops, but raising soil salinity is not so good, so we guess we had better keep looking. 
Use of sewage sludge has shown an increase in level of soil-available phosphorus and soil salinity, also heavy metals build-up. The findings of a 20-year field study of air, land,confirmed this ... via Sewage sludge - Wikipedia

2. Use it as Alternative Fuel source in the Cement Industry: 

An attractive disposal method for sewage sludge is to use it as alternative fuel source in the cement industry. The resultant ash is incorporated in the cement matrix. via Use of Sewage Sludge in Cement Industry - BioEnergy Consult

4. Make Coal: 

Carbonscape out of New Zealand microwaves and compresses organic matter – wood chips, corn stalks and even sewage – into eco-coal. It burns like regular coal, but the carbon doesn't come deep from the ground. Renewable Fuel Technology, meanwhile, has devised a modified version of the Fischer-Tropsch process to convert organic matter into coal. Organic matter gets converted to syngas first.

5. Produce Biogas and Purify that Into Pipeline-Grade Methane: 

BioEnergy Solutions builds, maintains and operates the anaerobic manure digesters that convert manure into methane. The process isn't entirely green – carbon dioxide in the gas from the manure has to be burned off before the methane can be sent down a pipeline – but it does eliminate many of the hazards associated with manure. Revenue can also be generated through carbon credits and selling the solids as cow beds or fodder for, maybe some day, organic flooring or building materials. via 11 Great Things to Do With Sewage | Greentech Media

6. Make a Sludge Compost Using USDA's Method:  

When sewage sludge and woodchips are mixed and composted, as by the Beltsville aerated pile method (Willson et al., 1980),!/ a stabilized product results from the action of aerobicthermophilic microorganisms, which utilize a part of the organic material for their growth and activity. During this decomposition, the composting biomass heats to temperatures in the pasteurization range of 55*^ to 70^C, with resulting destruction of enteric pathogenic microorganisms. The end result is a humuslike material useful as a soil conditioner and a source of plant nutrients. It is essentially free of human enteric pathogens and offensive odors. via Sludge Compost as - USDA 

7. Extract Gold from Sewage Sludge! 

In some sites, "concentrations of gold in sewage sludge are sufficiently high for recovery to be ... The USGS has explored ways to remove potentially dangerous metals from treated sewage that is used as fertilizer and also pursued the possibility of ... via There's Gold In Them Thar Sewage Pipes, Swiss Researchers Say

8. Use Sewage Treatment Plants Sludge toEnsure Greenery at 4 Parks: 

Secondary treated sewage will be further treated using chlorine. The settled sludge is sent for recirculation to the equalisation tank. The dry sludge coming out of the system can be used as manure. According to officials, this will be rolled out to other ... via Sewage treatment plants to ensure greenery at 4 parks

9. Extract energy from Sewage Sludge:



A water company says new techniques can help it extract 90% of calorific value from sewage sludge.

Thames Water is planning to greatly increase the amount of energy it can extract from sewage sludge.

The water company can currently only extract half of the calorific value – the energy contained in raw sewage – from the sludge it treats by using anaerobic digestion (AD) to turn it into gas.

However, external affairs and sustainability director Richard Aylard told the London Infrastructure Summit yesterday (October 2017) that the company was developing new AD methods that could nearly double the amount of energy it can use.

“That will get us to 90% and also massively reduce the amount of residue that has to go out to farms,” Aylard told delegates. via Thames Water to increase energy extraction from sewage

10. New Technology Turns Poo Sewage Sludge to Petroleum-Like Biocrude Oil
A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the US Department of Energy has found a way to reuse sewage sludge into biocrude oil, turning human waste into reusable fuel.

According to the study published by the PNNL, the researchers has devised a simple technology called hydrothermal processing (HTP). 

During HTP, sewage sludge is pressurized to about 3,000 pounds per square inch and then put into a reactor (a pressurized tube that's extremely hot at 660 degrees Fahrenheit). 

The heat in the reactor enables the cells in the sludge to break down, forming tow by-products: biocrude oil and "an aqueous liquid phase" that can be transformed into other kinds of chemical products.

"HTP converts organic material into biocrude oil, natural gas, or both, with potentially more than 99% conversion of organics. HTP uses the same processes which form fossil fuels, (heat, pressure, time, and water), but amplifies these conditions so the conversion occurs in a much shorter timeframe. 

This technology is specifically designed for wet feed stocks. The byproduct is clear, sterile water," the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WERF) told Treehugger.

We hope you agree that there are some truly remarkable uses for sewage sludge!
See also www.anaerobic-digestion.com/anaerobic-digestion-basics/anaerobic-sludge-digestion

Thursday, October 05, 2017

IADAB News Weekly - Edition 3: From a New ADBA Industry Guide to a Growing Network of UK AD Plants

The IPPTS Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas News WEEKLY

This is Issue 3 of IADAB News Weekly in which we summarise the most important news of the week in the fast moving world of the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry in the UK, and globally! 

This week has seen the publication of articles on a variety of subjects. Watch our intro video about this newsletter below an then scroll down, and read our summary of those articles which interest you;


The highest popularity has been an article on Linked-in with 82 Linked-in likes, explaining how anaerobic digestion facilities protect the environment. 

Following that with 15 Twitter likes is the new AD Industry Guide from ADBA, and a Science Direct Article about AD and nitrogen removal. 

If that's too high-brow for you, and you want some more practical news, we have AD Plant leader Tamar Energy discussing their growing AD plant network.



Alright, let’s get started…

1. AOE and Other Anaerobic Digester Facilities Protect Environment by Transforming Organic Waste Into Fertilizer and Clean Energy

Focusing on energy and fertiliser within this article they say:

BIOGAS

AOE Website image.
Click image to see a larger version.
Charles Vigliotti, AOE’s chief executive, told The New York Times Magazine that the biogas produced at his facility could generate an astounding nearly 50 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year. This [reduces the methane which would otherwise leak into the atmosphere producing environmental damage] and the newly harnessed energy will help power his facility, and can be sold to an electric company, and may also be used to fuel its fleet of trucks.

HIGH-NUTRIENT WATER AND FERTILIZER

The U.S. consumes close to 20 million tons of commercial fertilizer each year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And through the last 30 years, nitrogen fertilizer use has increased at a faster rate than phosphate and potash. Anaerobic digestion can produce organic fertilizers that typically contain many plant nutrients.

Click image to see a larger version.


[Anaerobic digestion helps protect the environment here as well.] Here’s how it works: After an anaerobic digester processes waste, what’s left is a material called digestate. In some parts of the world, that digestate is used to irrigate farm fields. In AOE’s case, the biogas company partnered with Scott’s Miracle-Gro to create high-nutrient water that eventually becomes organic nitrogen fertilizer. Organic fertilizers are also known to be slow-working, which decreases the chances of harming plants, unlike chemical-based fertilizers.

Even during a period in which governments and citizens alike are becoming more familiar with clean, renewable energy, it’s likely the notion of creating fuel to power trucks or entire facilities—or even water that can be used in organic fertilizer—would seem out of reach.

Not so, thanks to innovative companies such as American Organic Energy. via AOE & Other Anaerobic Digester Facilities Protect Environment By Transforming Organic Waste Into Fertilizer & Clean Energy

2. PRESS RELEASE: ADBA Releases Revamped AD Industry Guide

The Anaerobic Digestion and Bioresources Association (ADBA) has today released the second edition of The Practical Guide to AD, a key guidance document for developing and operating anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities in the UK.

ABDA Practical Guide to AD, cover image.
The Guide covers key topics of relevance to AD operators, including feedstocks, producing and using biogas and biomethane, digestate, planning, regulation, funding and insurance, training, and health and safety.

Over 50 contributors, a team of reviewers, and external stakeholders fed in their expertise and knowledge to update the Guide with the latest regulatory, policy and technological developments in the AD sector.

AD plants recycle organic wastes and convert purpose-grown crops into renewable heat and power, low-carbon transport fuel, and nutrient-rich biofertiliser. AD plants in the UK currently have enough capacity to power over a million homes as well as producing a range of co-benefits such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, supporting UK farmers, decarbonising large vehicles, and recovering resources from wastes.

ADBA Anaerobic digestion news cover image
The Guide will be a living document, updated online periodically in line with developments in the AD industry.

3. Nitrogen removal during anaerobic digestion of wasted activated sludge under supplementing Fe(III) compounds

Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction, i.e., Feammox, is playing an important part in nitrogen cycle of natural environments, which however has been rarely investigated in waste water/solid treatment processes. 

Ammonium as a byproduct of nitrogenous substance decomposition during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge usually presents a quite high content and poses a great risk to environment.

This study focused on investigating the effects of supplementing Fe(III) compounds in anaerobic digestion of sludge and especially evaluating the roles in nitrogen removal.

Feammox Process Diagram
(c) Feammox

Supplementing magnetite, Fe2O3 and Fe(OH)3 in anaerobic digesters all increased the methane production and sludge reduction. 

Importantly, these Fe(III) compounds induced Feammox to occur continuously. 

NO2- and NO3- were generated in the Fe(III)-added reactors, especially in Fe(OH)3-added reactor. 

Afterwards, NOx- would be reduced with organics or Fe(II) as electron donors. Consequently, 20.1% of total nitrogen was removed in Fe(OH)3-added reactor after 40 days. 

As a product of dissimilatory iron reduction (including Feammox), the Fe(II) content was far less than theoretical production through the stoichiometrical NH4+ removal in Feammox, implying that the Fe(II) /Fe(III) cycle likely occurred to trigger the successive nitrogen loss.

4. Tamar Energy - Their Network of Anaerobic Digestion and Composting Sites Doing Well

Tamar Energy webiste image.

The following is the list of Tamar Energy sites provided:

  1. Tempsford IVC Site
  2. Swanley OWC Site
  3. Lackford OWC Site
  4. Beddingham OWC Site
  5. Ongar OWC Site
  6. Parham IVC Site
  7. Basingstoke AD Plant
  8. Halstead AD Plant
  9. Hoddesdon AD Plant
  10. Holbeach AD Plant
  11. Retford AD Plant

Tamar Energy Anaerobic digestion plant location map and list image.
If you follow the link below, to Tamar Energy from his popular page.

Remember it is not just an article, rather it is a clever set of map links. Map-links which the visitor can click on for further information about the Tamar group and their growing AD plant network. via Our network of anaerobic digestion and composting sites

There it is. Plenty to be thinking about in anaerobic digestion and biogas for this week!
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You may also like our rare blog article titled: Anaerobic Digestion Gets Good Press