Friday, April 20, 2018

Biomethane News - New Era of Biomethane in Aircraft Fuel plus Tata Develops Biomethane Buses

There is no shortage of biomethane news these days.

Biomethane is simply a pure form of the raw biogas which bubbles out of the biogas digester, and it is becoming very common to build biogas plants which from the start will purify all their biogas into the much purer form known as biomethane.

This is often because most of the profits, and government subsidy from now-on, is expected to be directed at using the methane at the point of need for the energy.

Image Pixabayxusenru
Common biomethane uses are:
  • As renewable compressed natural gas in cyclinders (rCNG): for most uses you would put to any gas in cylinder for heating and propulsion.
  • As renewable compressed natural gas in cyclinders (rCNG): for road transport use (mentioned separately due to the potential massive size of this market.
  • As natural gas when injected at pressure into public gas supply networks.
Now that you know exactly what biomethane is, and what is is used for, our round-up of the recent biomethane news follows:

Biomethane News - Air Liquide doubles its biomethane production capacity

The three new biomethane production units commissioned by the Tier One player are located in the United States (Walnut, Mississippi), France (Cestas, near Bordeaux), and the United Kingdom (Northwick, near Birmingham).

With these units, Air Liquide has doubled its biomethane production capacity, which now stands at 60 MW, the equivalent of 500 GWh for a full year of production.

The new biomethane production unit in the United States is located in the Northeast Mississippi Landfill (NEML) site. This is the first large-scale unit built by Air Liquide in the United States. It purifies the biogas that results from household waste treatment sites and transforms it into biomethane.

In Europe, the units purify the biogas from farm waste and transform it into biomethane. Part of this biomethane is used for trucks fueled by bio-NGV (Natural Gas for Vehicles), a clean non-fossil fuel with no fine particulates emissions. via Air Liquide doubles its biomethane production capacity

Malmberg wins new biogas contract in Denmark in Latest Biomethane News

Malmberg has won its first biogas upgrade project in Italy. To the customer HERAmbiente S.p.A, which today has an existing composting plant in Sant Agata (BO), will be supplemented with treatment and digestion of 135,000 tonnes of food waste per year. Biomethane will be produced using Malmberg Compact® GR 20R. via Malmberg wins new biogas contract in Denmark.

New UK biofuel targets take effect April 15 2018

Encouraging biomethane news has been announced in the U.K. The new Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation came into force on April 15, requiring fuel companies to nearly triple the amount of renewable fuel they supply by 2032, introducing a new incentive for the production of fuels from waste, and bringing in new transportation sectors, such as aviation.

According to the U.K. Department for Transport, changes to the RTFO will require owners of transport fuel who supply at least 450,000 liters (118,877 gallons) per year to ensure the mix is at least 12.4 percent biofuel by 2032. The industry is currently only expected to meet a target of 4.75 percent biofuel. An intermediate target of 9.75 percent is also set for 2020.

The regulations also set an additional target for advanced waste-based renewable fuels that starts at 0.1 percent in 2019 and increases to 2.8 percent by 2032.

An initial cap of 4 percent crop-based biofuels is set for 2018. The cap is reduced annually from 2021 to reach 3 percent in 2026 and 2 percent in 2032.

In addition, the regulations bring renewable aviation fuels and renewable fuels of non-biological origin into the scheme.

The U.K. government is also challenging the sector to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emission by 6 percent by 2020. That reduction, when coupled with the RTFO changes, is expected to support the U.K.’s low carbon fuel industry while helping to makes its transport sector more sustainable.

“This is an exciting time for renewable transport,” said Nina Skorupska, chief executive of the REA. “These new regulations will fire the starting gun on the U.K.’s development of novel fuels for aviation and other forms of transport which are hard to decarbonize, and build on our leadership position in the production of renewable fuels for road transport.”

“The prospects are great for increasing the amount of renewable gas used for fueling heavy goods vehicles,” added John Baldwin, chair of REA’s Biogas Group. “Running these HGVs on green gas reduces carbon emissions by almost 90 percent, plus it reduces particulates, NOx and noise.

“Fleet operators such as Waitrose and Asda are already converting to renewable gas, their drivers love the new vehicles, and these regulations will encourage more fleets to do so in the future,” Baldwin added. via New UK biofuel targets take effect April 15

Global Biomethane Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Key Players

Questale published a new in-depth industry research that focuses on Global Biomethane market, delivers detailed analysis of market and future prospects of Global Biomethane market. 

The critical and significant data in the study makes the research a very important tool for experts, analysts and managers to get ready-to-access analysis by the industry professionals. 

The research is attached with substantial information in the form of graphs and tables to understand important market trends, drivers and challenges. 

The study is segmented by Application/ end users (Automotive, Electronics, Metal and Machining, Plastic and Polymers, Food and Beverages & Others), products type (Upto 5kg, 5~10 kg & Above 10kg) and various important geographies like China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, India, Southeast Asia & Australia.  via Future of the Global Biomethane Market – Growth, Latest Trend & Forecast 2022

Biomethane Market to Reach a Valuation of US $2,624.5 Mn by 2025


The front runners in the global biomethane gas market, according to one of the reports by Transparency Market Research, are:
  • CNG Services Ltd., 
  • Planet Biogas Global GmbH, SGN, 
  • Future Biogas Ltd., 
  • VERBIO, 
  • Magne Gas, 
  • Gasrec, 
  • Gazasia Ltd., 
  • Biogas Products Ltd., 
  • Schmack Carbotech GmbH, 
  • EnviTec Biogas AG, 
  • SoCalGas, 
  • ETW Energietechnik GmbH, 
  • ORBITAL, and 
  • JV Energen.

As per estimates of a report by Transparency Market Research, the global biomethane market stood at a valuation of US$1,485.4 mn in 2016 and is expected to reach a valuation of US$2,624.5 mn by 2025 rising at a CAGR of 6.7% between 2017 and 2025.

North America and Europe to Continue Garnerning Significant Market Shares

The segments of the global biomethane market based upon application are automotive sector and power generation. The automotive sector is expected to account for a significant share in the market over the forecast period.

The key regional segments into which the global market for biomethane is divided in this report are North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East and Africa. In 2016, North America and Europe held a significant share of the global biomethane market. The trend is expected to continue over the forecast period as well.

Feasibility of Biomethane as an Automobile Fuel Fuels Growth

One of the key growth drivers of the global biomethane market is the green gas characteristic of biomethane. Biomethane is produced by the natural breakdown of organic material, which includes green waste, agricultural waste, food industry waste, household waste, and even industrial waste. The process of production of biomethane involves breaking down of organic matter in an anaerobic environment to produce biogas, which is further purified to produce biomethane. The resultant gas can be used as a vehicle fuel or can be injected into the main gas network to generate green energy.
via Biomethane Market to Reach a Valuation of US $2,624.5 Mn by 2025

Tata Motors develops country’s first biomethane bus

Tata Motors has developed country’s first Bio-CNG (bio-methane) bus which was unveiled recently at a bio-energy programme, ‘Urja Utsav’. The firm, which is India’s largest commercial vehicles manufacturer, said the bio-methane engines could be used in LCV, ICV and MCV buses.

At the Urja Utsav held in Pune’s Shiv Chhatrapati Sports Complex, Tata displayed three engines, along with the lead model — Tata LPO 1613 with 5.7 SGI NA BS-IV IOBD-II compliant bus.

The event, which was organised by the government, was attended by Minister of State (Independent) for Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas Dharmendra Pradhan and MoS (Independent) for Power, Coal, New and Renewable Energy and Mines Piyush Goyal.

“The use of Bio-CNG will contribute in a positive manner to the Smart Cities proposition of keeping them clean and is a good option for wet garbage management,” Head of Commercial Vehicles Business in Tata Motors, Girish Wagh, said in a statement.

Rajendra Petkar, Head of Power System, Engineering said: “The showcase of the Bio-Methane bus is a step towards developing environment-friendly vehicles. Biomethane escapes into the atmosphere unused. If trapped and used in engines, it reduces the net impact on the environment and at the same time produces useful power.” via Tata Motors develops country’s first biomethane bus

We think that after browsing the wide range of news which is bubbling in the biomethane from biogas/ anaerobic digestion sector, you will agree that the future is bright globally for the anaerobic digestion and biomethane industry.

Monday, March 19, 2018

IADAB News Edition 19 - Quail-waste Biogas - Car Plant Going CO2 Neutral - Bio-energy Preferred Over Solar and Making Char

Date: 13 March 2018: This is Issue 19 of the IADAB News Weekly, where we summarise the news of the week in the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry.
A brief summary roundup of the week's news follows, with an accent on biogas:

First, it is good to start with an unusual anaerobic digestion plant feedstock, as it is a reminder that there are many untapped materials which can be used to make biogas. In the case, it is about a farmer who makes a nice profit from his home produced quail-waste based biogas. Many others could be making biogas like this...

Second, using biogas as a sustainable renewable vehicle fuel source is helping Audi's Brussels plant go CO2 neutral.

Third, VSolar in Malaysia foresee better profitability in the future from biogas than solar power. In future they are going to focus on Renewable Energy from biomass. The business is investing in bio-energy, and expects its new 10MW biogas energy to contribute to company profits in late 2019

Fourth, a scientific research paper describes how charcoal made from anaerobically digested dairy fibre, can be used for removal of hydrogen sulphide within biogas plants. The study found that the quality of the char produced was a good as activated carbon. This looks like a great use for the digestate fibre from biogas plants.

Fifth, the Finnish Government is continuing to support increased biogas production, with investment in a new anaerobic digestion facility. Its all part of their plans to increase the use of renewable energy in a sustainable way, so that its share of the total, will rise to more than 50% during the 2020s.

Finally, Reading buses are going green, and no doubt air-pollution rates will drop as a result. Reading Buses are now testing 17 Scania double-decker biogas buses in service.

The following is our intro video. Watch the intro video below, for a taster of what you will read if you scroll down below the video:


Alright, let’s get started with the detailed articles… (Scroll down for each extract and use the links to the full articles on each of the individual websites.)

1 - Continuous profit from quail-waste based biogas

Sutarman can never hide his smile as his quail egg business gradually grows. He can sell an average of 30 to 40 kilograms of eggs per day.

The 57-year-old farmer also breeds hundreds of ducks, cattle and goats in one compound. Assisted by his wife, Tampar, 56, he boils hundreds of quail eggs every 30 minutes to then be sold in town. Despite the intensity of boiling, the couple showed not a single sign of concern over the supply of cooking gas.

“I don’t have any problem using the gas stove for a long period as it’s free of charge,” says Sutarman while pointing at the bright blue flame bursting out from the stove in the corner of his kitchen. He proudly showed how his stove produces a bright blue flame that most commercial liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or cooking gas stoves cannot.

Such a quality of flame can only emerge from gas produced by his quails’ waste. The family can run their business more cheaply with a cooking gas supply thanks to waste from the 5,000 quails that they breed. Bird waste that the grandfather of seven initially considered useless can now be converted into an alternative energy source: biogas. via quailbiogas

2 - Biogas helps Audi Brussels plant go CO2 neutral

Audi Brussels has been awarded a CO2 neutral certificate by the Belgian testing company Vinçotte.

IADAB News Edition 19 - Quail-waste Biogas - Helping car maker Audi.
According to a statement, the award means Audi Brussels is operating the world’s first certified CO2 neutral high volume production plant in the premium segment.

The German car maker’s Belgian facility covers all production processes and all other emissions generated at the plant either by renewable energies (approximately 95%), or compensates for them though environmental projects (5%).

Biogas is playing a crucial role in the facility’s strive to carbon neutrality, fulfilling the heating needs for the plant itself as well as the offices on site. via AudiBrusselsCO2

3 - VSolar to focus on RE business, expects 10MW biogas energy to contribute in late 2019


KUALA LUMPUR (March 14): VSolar Group Bhd which recently scrapped a plan to build a solar power generation plan with Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), citing the poor rates of return, is planning to stop its solar business and concentrate on its renewable energy (RE) business.

Its group executive director Edward Leung Kok Keong said the group currently still has its 1MW generating solar power plant in Simpang Pulai, Perak and would stop at that.

“We are stopping at that (the 1MW solar power plant in Simpang Pulai) because our financial assessment indicated that the payback period is too long and the financials does not make sense.

“So we are staying away from solar and we are now looking at another alternative which is RE technology that we could invest in, because the financials make sense,” he told reporters after the group's extraordinary general meeting today.

VSolar expects its 10MW biomass/biogas energy generation plant, which it has entered into a joint venture with a Singapore firm KRU Energy Asia Pte Ltd, Rangkaian Iltizam Sdn Bhd which is KRU’s subsidiary, and a local citizen Kenneth Lee Wai Tong in August last year, to start contributing to the group’s revenue in late 2019.

Leung said VSolar has submitted its application to the Sustainable Energy Development Authority Malaysia (SEDA) and is now waiting for approval before the group can kick-start the project. via VSolarREbusiness

4 - Charcoal from anaerobically digested dairy fibre for removal of hydrogen sulfide within biogas

Anaerobically digested fibrous solid (AD fiber) is an abundant material that offers potential to produce value-added products such as biochar.

The objective of this paper is to better understand how thermochemical processing conditions affect the capacity of biochars derived from AD fiber to adsorb H2S from biogas.

AD fiber was pyrolyzed in an electric tube reactor at temperatures up to 600 °C and 60 min. The chars were employed for H2S scrubbing tests from a synthetic biogas.

Results showed that the chars’ capacity for H2S removal is comparable to that of activated carbon. via Charcoalhydrogensulfide

5 - Finnish Government supports increased biogas production

The Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment has granted Gasum €7.83 million in ‘Bioeconomy and clean solutions’ key project support for increased biogas production. 

Developing the biogas market and the transport use of natural gas and increasing biogas production capacity are key elements of the Gasum strategy. The company has examined the possibility of constructing a biogas plant in Munkkaa, Lohja, in Southern Finland.

The objective of the Government’s Bioeconomy and clean solutions key projects is to increase the use of renewable energy in a sustainable way so that its share will rise to more than 50% during the 2020s. via Finnishbiogas

6 - Reading Buses Testing 17 Scania Double-Decker Biogas Buses

Scania has completed delivery of 17 new biogas-powered Double-Decker buses to Reading Buses (UK), according to a new press release. The new biogas-powered buses are being put into service on Reading’s reportedly busiest route, the “Purple 17.” via ReadingBuses

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Tuesday, March 13, 2018

IADAB News - Edition 18 - Anaerobic Digesters for the Queen, Poultry Litter, with Ozone and as Fertiliser

Date: 13 March 2018: This is Issue 18 of the IADAB News Weekly, where we summarise the news of the week in the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry.


 Image to illustrate IADAB News Weekly
A brief summary roundup of the week's news follows:


First we feature an article which has provoked social media attention in the last week, which says that the installation of Anaerobic Digestion is gaining popularity and the development momentum is positive.

Second, there is the announcement from Buckingham Palace of plans for an Anaerobic Digester Fit for a Queen!

Thirdly, it seems that using anaerobic digestate as a fertiliser can save farmers £110/ha on bagged fertiliser/ annum. It is possibly only for the experts to do it just yet, because they say that getting it wrong will not only bring the risk of being on the wrong side of the law, but it can also have adverse affects on soil and the environment.

Fourth, Stream BioEnergy announce that the World’s first poultry litter anaerobic digester is up and running. Can it really be the very first in the world?

Fifth, Air products and Chemicals Inc. is patenting its methods for using ozone to enhance anaerobic digestion. It seems a reasonable bet that ozone can be used as a method to pre-treat digester feedstocks for quicker and more complete biogas production.

Finally, in our sixth item, a new US report is available on Global Anaerobic Digesters Market Demand, Trends, Opportunities and Forecast Report 2018.

Alright, let’s get started with the detailed articles… (Scroll down for each extract and use the links to the full articles on each of the individual websites.)

The following is our intro video. Watch the intro video below, for a taster of what you will read if you scroll down below the video:



Please comment below: Did you like the new format and the cartoons or not? Please tell us your opinion by commenting below.

1 - Anaerobic Digestion Gaining Popularity and Development Momentum

Converting waste into energy with the help of anaerobic digestion is a fast-growing trend spreading across industries and countries throughout the world.



As the technology improves and the process gains acceptance, announcements of new projects are becoming quite commonplace.

That’s great news for the environment, and the team at American Organic Energy is thrilled to be part of this innovative and important movement.

2 - An Anaerobic Digester Fit for a Queen?

It’s true. The Royal Family in London, England recently jumped on board the trend, too, announcing several energy efficient initiatives. In addition to installing solar panels and ground source heat pumps, Buckingham Palace is looking to construct an anaerobic digestion unit to generate fuel from its organic waste.



According to its estimates, these efforts “would reduce carbon emissions by an estimated 554 tons a year.”

It’s hard to top an announcement like this from one of the most prominent figures on Earth, but the Queen isn’t the only one throwing her hat—eh, crown—into the ring. via A D Gaining Popularity

3 - Tips on using anaerobic digestate as a fertiliser

Using anaerobic digestate to feed arable crops can save farmers up to £110/ha on bagged fertiliser costs. However, there are many rules on its application in the UK.

Getting it wrong will not only bring the risk of being on the wrong side of the law, but it can also have adverse affects on soil and the environment, such as reduced earthworm numbers when applied at too high a rate.

Image is a humorous cartoon about using anaerobic digestate as a fertiliser.


Farmers Weekly gets some advice from an independent expert on how to reap the benefits, the right way... via TipsFarmersWeekly

4 - World’s first poultry litter anaerobic digester up and running

What is thought to be the world’s first anaerobic digestion (AD) plant using only poultry litter as feedstock is up and running in Northern Ireland.

Located at Tully near Ballymena, Stream BioEnergy and its partners received the go-ahead for the plant in June of 2016. The facility first went into production in 2017. via PoultrylitterAD


5 - New Patent Air products and Chemicals Inc. - Methods For Using Ozone To Enhance Anaerobic Digestion

Ozone (O3) is a powerful disinfectant with many industrial and commercial applications. For example, ozone is used to oxidize organic contaminants from drinking water, including the naturally occurring taste- and odor-causing compounds. ...

It has been found that ozone may also be used to enhance anaerobic digestion by converting difficult to biodegrade compounds into more easily biodegradable compounds. Ozone may be used in this way to enhance biogas production from anaerobic digestion. For anaerobic digestion of sludge, it is theorized that the ozone lyses the cell membranes, thereby exposing the more easily biodegradable cytoplasm of the bacteria.

Image illustrates using ozone to enhance biogas.


Fermentation waste, often called vinasse, can contain compounds such as phenols that are toxic to the anaerobic bacteria and other larger carbon-based compounds that are recalcitrant.

Pretreating this feed with ozone will reduce or eliminate the toxic compounds and make the larger compounds more biodegradable, thereby reducing the required residence time in the digester.

In an anaerobic digestion process, it is undesirable to have excess oxygen present because the oxygen reduces the methane (CH4) yield by promoting aerobic digestion.

Accordingly, there is a need for an improved method of recovering un-reacted oxygen from an ozone-generation process so that the effluent may be efficiently used for an anaerobic digestion process, while maintaining high efficiency in the ozone-generation system. via Ozone-FreePatentsOnline

6 - Global Anaerobic Digesters Market Demand, Trends, Opportunities and Forecast Report 2018 


Albany, US, 2018-Mar-08 — An up-to-date research report has been disclosed by Market Research Hub highlighting the title “Global AD Market Report 2018” which provides an outlook of current market growth as well as the expected forecast including Rate on Investment (ROI) together with growing CAGR.



This report studies the Anaerobic Digesters market status and outlook of global and United States, from angles of players, regions, product types and end industries; this report analyzes the top players in global and United States market, and splits the Anaerobic Digesters market by product type and application/end industries. via GlobalAnaerobic Digesters Market Demand, Trends, Opportunities and Forecast Report 2018

Attribution: Buckingham Palace Picture. CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=69391

Sunday, March 04, 2018

IADAB News - Edition 17 - Biomethane Italy's €4.7bn for Biofuels - New Map - CNG Shuttle Buses

Date: 4 March 2018: This is Issue 17 of the IADAB News Weekly, where we summarise the news of the week in the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry.

It's been a few weeks since we looked at developments in biomethane projects. These are anaerobic digestion and biogas plant projects where the raw biogas will be further treated to clean it to the same standard as natural gas. This means that the Anaerobic Digestion Facility operator will be able to sell the "biomethane" energy into the natural gas distribution system, or for other uses such as to replace CNG as a renewable fuel for vehicles.

First we have the welcome news that the European Commission cleared a 4.7 billion Euros ($5.73 billion) support scheme in Italy for advanced biomethane and biofuels, 

We wanted to know more about this and found out that the scheme, which will run until 2022, supports the production and distribution of second and third-generation biofuels for use in transport vehicles. 

Third this week, is that the European Biogas Association and Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE) have collaborated on a comprehensive map of all known biomethane installations currently running in Europe. The‘European Biomethane Map 2018’ lists over 500 units on the continent, and we welcome this because the AD industry really needs to publicise their success and listing each biomethane plant is an essential first step to keeping the public informed.

Fourth, and finally, we have the news that, as part of its commitment to environmental responsibility, the Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport is launching of a fleet of biogas-powered shuttle vehicles. There will be 7 buses equipped to use this renewable biofuel to start with.

Alright, let’s get started with the detailed articles… (Scroll down for each extract and use the links to the full articles on each of the individual websites.)

The following is our intro video. Watch the intro video below, for a taster of what you will read if you scroll down below the video:



1 - EU Clears Italian Support Scheme For Advanced Biomethane And Biofuels

BRUSSELS, March 1 (Reuters)
The European Commission on Thursday cleared a 4.7 billion euros ($5.73 billion) support scheme in Italy for advanced biomethane and biofuels, saying it was in line with state-aid rules. "The scheme will encourage the production and consumption of advanced biofuels ... via Reuters

2 - EU approves Italy's €4.7bn public support for biofuels

Image for anaerobic digestion news (IADAB) edition 17
Energy Live News - Energy Made Easy
Italy's plans to provide €4.7 billion (£4.2bn) of public support for advanced biomethane and biofuels have been approved by the European Commission. The scheme, which will run until 2022, supports the production and distribution of second and third-generation biofuels for use in transport. via European Commission

3 - Map of over 500 European biomethane facilities released

The European Biogas Association and Gas Infrastructure Europe (GIE) have collaborated on a comprehensive map of all known biomethane installations currently running in Europe.

‘European Biomethane Map 2018’ lists over 500 units on the continent, and according to its creators is the first of its kind. It’s been produced with information taken from biogas associations, energy agencies and companies.

Map of Biomethane Plants in Europe


“The number of biomethane plants in Europe has been considerably increasing in recent years, reaching over 500 units today,” said Jan Stambasky, president of the European Biogas Association (EBA).

“EBA and GIE have decided to illustrate this positive trend with this map, which provides a high-quality overview of the main technical features, current status and location of existing installations. With the huge development of the biomethane sector expected in the coming years, this pioneering map might be the first in a long series.”

According to an EBA statement, the map provides specific details about each biomethane plant, including connections to the gas grid, feed-in capacity, main substrate used, upgrading process and date of start of operation. Cross-border interconnection points and pipelines are also indicated.
via Map 500 European biomethane facilities


4 - Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport Rolls Out Biomethane Fuelled Shuttle Buses

As part of its commitment to environmental responsibility, the Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport is launching of a fleet of biogas-powered shuttle vehicles and creating an agricultural club.

A fleet of seven shuttles, running exclusively on renewable natural gas were recently brought into service at this airport. The customised shuttles have been designed and fitted out to convey passengers between the car parks and the terminals.

(c) Lyon-Saint Exupéry airport

This initiative is part of the ACA 3+ accreditation obtained in May 2017 by Aéroports de Lyon, supported by AirPact, the global environment policy of VINCI Airports.

Lyon-Saint Exupéry airport further confirms its commitment to environmental responsibility with another initiative – creation of an agricultural club, a unique space for dialogue enabling the airport and the farmers managing the site’s land reserves to work together to develop sustainable and innovative agriculture. via Lyon-Saint Exupéry airport

We hope you found this week's anaerobic digestion news informative. Watch out for next week's news!
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Sunday, February 25, 2018

IADAB News - Edition 16 - AD vs Incineration Icknield Farm Plant Sold Blackburn Meadows Biogas

Date: 25 February 2018: This is Issue 16 of the IADAB News Weekly, where we summarise the news of the week in the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry.
Picture shows anaerobic digestion vs incineration as an image.
SCROLL DOWN FOR THE VIDEO!

This week we are featuring 4 UK stories as follows:



The first for popularity was our video Disadvantages of Incineration vs Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas.  The video is a short into video, based upon a report accepted by the London Assembly’s Environment Committee, as reported in PR by ADBA titled "Anaerobic digestion industry welcomes London Assembly incineration report".

Second, we include the news that John Laing Environmental Assets has invested in the Icknield Farm anaerobic digestion (AD) plant, which it now owns. The company says that the AD sector is attractive to JLEN due to the high proportion of inflation-linked revenues backed by government subsidy regimes.

Third, Sheffield Blackburn Meadows Wastewater Treatment Plant has received an upgrade providing a new Anaerobic Digestion Plant in South Yorkshire.

Fourth and finally, in the news is that the North Selby Anaerobic Digestion & Horticultural Glasshouse Project is in consultation. Subject to planning, this new AD Plant will provide a new horticultural glasshouse facility for one of the country’s leading specialist plant propagation companies, using heat and electricity provided by a co-located Anaerobic Digestion (AD) facility.

Alright, let’s get started with the detailed articles… (Scroll down for each extract and use the links to the full articles on each of the individual websites.)

The following is our intro video. Watch the intro video below, for a taster of what you will read if you scroll down below the video:



1 - Disadvantages of Incineration vs Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas

We recommend that you read the full article about the disadvantages of Incineration vs Anaerobic Digestion, which is based upon a report accepted by the London Assembly’s Environment Committee, as reported in PR by ADBA titled "Anaerobic digestion industry welcomes London Assembly incineration report". Go to the above link to read our additional comments on the topic of disadvantages of burning waste and our wider perspective on this. via Incineration vs Biogas

Top tips on growing maize for anaerobic digestion
Building of new AD plants has stagnated somewhat, but there are still opportunities for farmers to grow maize for existing plants and make use of the digestate they produce. Growing maize for anaerobic digestion (AD) plants has seen a substantial increase in the last three years.

From harvest 2015 to harvest 2016 it saw a 55 per cent increase. However, more recently there has been a stagnation in construction of new AD plants as operators wait for the new Renewable Heat Incentive tariff to be agreed by the Government.

New legislation means new AD plants can only use 50 per cent of crop-based feedstock, whereas for existing ones it can be 100 per cent.

However, there are still significant opportunities for arable farmers to grow maize for AD plants and benefit from the digestate by-product they produce, believes Jon Myhill, technical feedstock manager, Future Biogas, which operates 11 plants, primarily in Norfolk, Lincolnshire, South Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire, procuring crops, straw and manure from 11,000ha (27,170 acres).

“The AD industry’s selling point is that it’s a local market for farms and they are not exposed to volatile prices – the maize price doesn’t really fluctuate year-on-year. Prices are not at the top and not at the bottom, but as long as you get the yield, it’s not a risk every year growing it,” says Mr Myhill.

AD maize facts

  • 52,000ha of maize grown for AD in 2016, an increase of 55 per cent on the previous year 
  • AD accounts for 29 per cent of the total maize area in England 
  • Maize growing accounts for one per cent of the total arable area in England
via Top tips on growing maize for anaerobic digestion

2 - John Laing Environmental Adds Another Anaerobic Digestion Asset

John Laing Environmental has added another anaerobic digestion asset – John Laing Environmental Assets has announced an investment in the Icknield Farm anaerobic digestion (AD) plant. The investment consists of the provision of a debt facility to repay existing loans and acquisition of a minority equity stake from private individuals who were the project’s developers for an aggregate amount of c.GBP11m.

The Icknield Farm AD plant, located in Ipsden, South Oxfordshire, was commissioned in December 2014. The plant has a capacity of c.5MW and predominantly produces biomethane exported to the national gas grid. In addition, the plant also has a 0.4MW CHP engine and is accredited under the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) and Feed-in-Tariff (FiT).

The Icknield Farm AD plant is JLEN’s second investment in the AD sector, building upon the recent acquisition of the Vulcan AD plant, to establish a growing portfolio of AD assets and further diversify the Company’s portfolio of environmental infrastructure projects including, wind, solar, waste and wastewater.

This acquisition brings the total capacity of the renewable energy assets in the JLEN portfolio to 259.2MW.

Richard Morse, the JLEN chairman, said “We are pleased to make a further investment in the anaerobic digestion sector through the Icknield Farm AD plant, which has a proven operational history. 

The AD sector is attractive to JLEN due to the high proportion of inflation-linked revenues backed by government subsidy regimes, and we look forward to working with our partners in the sector.” via JLEN Buys AD

3 - Sheffield Blackburn Meadows Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade: Anaerobic Digestion Plant – South Yorkshire

Blackburn Meadows wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is located in the city of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, UK.

The plant was upgraded by a joint venture (JV) of AECOM and Galliford Try under two contracts worth £49m ($78m). The JV primarily improved and added new facilities at the site to expand the plant’s capacity to serve up to 830,000 people.

Worth around £19m ($30m), the second contract enables the plant to treat 21,000t of sludge on an annual basis, with integrated thickening and dewatering processes. Upgradation was completed in April 2016.

The project involved the construction of new inlet works, eight new primary settlement tanks, and aeration lanes, including the replacement of various facilities.

The second contract included the installation of a new mesophilic anaerobic digestion facility at the plant. It involved construction of buildings and various other pieces of equipment required to treat sludge. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion enables the breakdown of biodegradable materials using micro-organisms under moderate temperatures.

The new sludge treatment facility enables neighbouring farmlands to use the recycled sludge as manure. The facility also enables Yorkshire Water to generate 1.9MW of renewable energy using combined heat and power units.

The whole project is expected to reduce carbon emissions by 6,500t, and greenhouse emissions by up to 30%. via Sheffield Blackburn Meadows Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade: Anaerobic Digestion Plant

4 - Peel – North Selby Anaerobic Digestion and Horticultural Glasshouse – North Yorkshire

The North Selby Anaerobic Digestion & Horticultural Glasshouse Project is in consultation and will provide a new horticultural glasshouse facility for one of the country’s leading specialist plant propagation companies, using heat and electricity provided by a co-located Anaerobic Digestion (AD) facility. The AD facility will employ combined heat and power (CHP) units to generate heat and electricity from up to 60,000 tonnes of organic waste (source separated food waste, commercial and industrial waste and agricultural waste) per year.


Our plans now include a horticultural glasshouse which will use heat and electricity generated by the AD facility, making the two facilities ideal for co-location. The North Selby site provides a suitable location for the facility due to its topography, existing grid connection and other infrastructure, access to good transport links and existing screening.

The plant propagation facility will be operated by Howden based specialists Plant Raisers – the UK’s foremost plant propagator for the horticultural sector – which has a vast amount of experience and continues to lead the way in new techniques and developments.

Plant Raisers is the largest tomato, cucumber and pepper plant propagator in the UK and the only one to have a quality system certified to conform to BS ISO 9001:2008.

Our project will use Anaerobic Digestion (AD) technology to generate heat and electricity from up to 60,000 tonnes of feedstock which will comprise organic waste such as separately collected food waste, materials arising from a broad range of commercial and industrial operations (such as waste from restaurants, schools, food processing plants and supermarkets) and agricultural wastes.

The main products resulting from anaerobic digestion are biogas - a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide which is very similar to natural gas - and digestate which can be used as a bio- fertiliser.

The biogas can be used to generate electricity, gas or heat, or compressed for use as a biofuel. via Peel – North Selby Anaerobic Digestion and Horticultural Glasshouse – North Yorkshire - Construction Project Profile.

We hope you found this week's anaerobic digestion news informative. Watch out for next week's news!

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NAO Renewable Heat Report - Green Gas Industry Reaction

Green gas industry responds to the UK's national Audit Office (NAO) Renewable Heat Report

Image of the Renewable Heat Report thumb

This article is a little way off from our usual subject matter, so let us just say that by "Green Gas" we are referring to is simply renewable gas such as biogas, and its product after upgrading to raise its purity "biomethane". So, the green gas industry referred to is partly the anaerobic digestion and biogas industry. It also includes renewable methane from other processes.

One big benefit from green gas is that it is home-grown and reduces need for expensive natural-gas imports.

Before you start reading the Press Release below, we can tell you that green gas production has NAO support. It's not surprising that the anaerobic digestion, and bioresources industry is keen to publicise the NAO's advice.

The ADBA Press Release follows:

Industry echoes NAO call for govt. to address policy gap by providing long-term support for renewable heat and introducing effective carbon price

Report says successor policy to RHI will be announced this year.

Responding to a new report from the National Audit Office (NAO) on the cost-effectiveness of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI), Charlotte Morton, Chief Executive of the Anaerobic Digestion & Bioresources Association, said:

“As one of the technologies supported by the RHI, biomethane (or green gas) is currently heating over 300,000 homes and displacing almost 800,000 tonnes of CO2, the equivalent to taking almost a million cars off our roads."
"As a home-grown, renewable source of heat, it is helping to decarbonise the UK’s gas grid and improving energy security through reducing the need for expensive natural-gas imports from unstable parts of the world."
"With support for the RHI due to end in 2021, we’re calling on the government to put in place long-term support for renewable heat to help give certainty to the green gas industry. The government should also set an effective carbon price that would better demonstrate green gas’s excellent value for money in reducing emissions and producing home-grown renewable heat.”
Meg Hillier MP, Chair of the Committee of Public Accounts, said on the publication of the NAO’s RHI report:
“The government faces a huge challenge in cutting harmful carbon emissions. The NAO report shows how the government has massively cut back its ambitions for this scheme, and that as a result it will have to work even harder elsewhere.”
"But right now the government doesn’t know how it is going to cut carbon from heating systems in millions of homes and businesses around the country. There is a limited amount of time to work with, so it needs to start making real progress now.”

ADBA understands that some of the recommendations made in the report have already been incorporated into the RHI reforms that are currently going through Parliament, which, if passed, will give a vital boost to green gas production in the UK.

The report states that a decision on the successor policy to the RHI is due to be announced this year.


Sources: National Audit Office: https://www.nao.org.uk/

Anaerobic Digestion & Bioresources Association (ADBA) website: www.adbioresources.org

PRESS RELEASE: Anaerobic digestion industry welcomes laying of RHI legislation: http://adbioresources.org/news/press-release-anaerobic-digestion-industry-welcomes-laying-of-rhi-legislati


Sunday, February 11, 2018

IADAB News - Edition 15 - UK Food Waste Company Take-over Irish WWTW AD Plans and Biogas Buses

Date: 11 February 2018: This is Issue 15 of the IADAB News Weekly, where we summarise the news of the week in the Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Industry.

Image shows: Biogas News plus Anaerobic Digestion News
SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO!
This week we are featuring 4 UK events in the AD scene in the UK, and one in the US. These are chosen as being the items which have scored most highly based upon the last seven days of social network interaction across Twitter, Facebook, and Linked-In (provided by Kudani).

The first item is the surprise acquisition of Tamar Energy by Biogen, which amounts to a substantial re-alignment of food waste AD capacity in the South of England. It may help reduce the downward trend in gate-fees for Food Waste disposal in the south of the UK, but that will remain to be seen.

Next, in Ireland there is good news for growth in AD, during Irish Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) upgrades. When these are completed, it is proposed that the number of sites with anaerobic digestion will increased by 5.

Next, we have a new US item. the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) issued a request for proposals to procure up to 899,250 MWh/year of renewable energy, and our reading of the request is that AD bids could make up the lion share, if companies put AD plant options in their proposals. There is not much time though with a short deadline for bidders to make their submissions.

Finally, we have two UK items. The first is an ADBA post in which it joins an industry-wide call for the government to issue a long-awaited FIT consultation, so that much needed confidence in continuity of the subsidy scheme can return and allow investment to flow into new projects.

Our fifth and last item is welcome. £40 million will awarded to Councils for low emission buses. Using the money councils will be able to retrofit vehicles with technology to reduce tailpipe emissions of nitrogen dioxide. Retrofitting buses to use biomethane as a vehicle fuel offers a carbon reduction and can help reduce air pollution.

Alright, let’s get started… (Scroll down for each extract and use the links to the full articles on each of the individual websites.)

The following is our intro video. Watch the intro video below, for a taster of what you will read if you scroll down below the video:



1. Biogen Acquires Tamar Energy

Biogen has expanded its food waste recycling network through the acquisition of Tamar Energy, one of the largest anaerobic digestion (AD) owners and operators in the UK. The acquisition was completed by Ancala Partners LLP, the independent mid-market infrastructure investment manager for an undisclosed sum. 

A number of Tamar Energy's existing shareholders have rolled-over their investment into the combined group. The acquisition creates one of the largest independent AD operators in the UK. via anaerobic digestion food waste industry food waste management renewable energy

2. Ambitious Plans for More Wastewater Anaerobic Digestion Plants in Ireland

Maximising energy recovery from sludges through anaerobic digestion is at the heart of Irish Water’s National Wastewater Sludge Management Plan:

“There are 14 wastewater treatment plants in Ireland with anaerobic digestion currently in operation. More than 50 per cent of all wastewater sludge was anaerobically digested in 2014. This is expected to increase to approximately 65 per cent when WWTP upgrades, currently under way, are completed. It is proposed that the number of sites with anaerobic digestion is increased to 19, as the optimum strategy for treatment, with the biogas produced used for energy recovery in all cases.
Advanced anaerobic digestion followed by reuse of the residual bio-solids on land has been evaluated to be the most sustainable solution for wastewater sludge treatment and disposal.” via bridging skills gap

3. Connecticut Issues New RFP For Offshore Wind, Fuel Cell, And Anaerobic Digestion Projects

Last week, the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) issued a request for proposals to procure up to 899,250 MWh/year of renewable energy and associated Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from offshore wind, fuel cell, and anaerobic digestion renewable energy resources, pursuant to long-term contracts of up to 20 years. Bidders must submit completed proposals to DEEP by April 2, 2018. Connecticut will announce winning bids in June 2018. via Connecticut Issues New RFP

4. ADBA joins industry-wide call for long-awaited FIT consultation

ADBA has today joined a number of trade associations to write to Rt Hon Greg Clark MP, Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, regarding the long-awaited Feed-in Tariff consultation.

The letter highlights the contribution renewables technologies supported under the FIT make to UK energy and carbon targets. With the FIT scheduled to close to new applicants in March 2019, the letter calls on BEIS to address the uncertainty this cliff-edge end date poses, by working with industry to deliver alternative routes to market.

In support of the letter Charlotte Morton, Chief Executive of ADBA, said:

The UK’s anaerobic digestion (AD) industry has already delivered so much, powering over a million homes and reducing the UK’s greenhouse (GHG) gas emissions by 1%, particularly in challenging areas such as agriculture. With the right support, however, it could meet 30% of current household electricity demand, quadruple its contribution to reducing UK GHG emissions, and provide 30,000 rural jobs. While AD is an established technology, the absence of a FIT post March 2019 is a serious threat to the viability of the UK AD industry and its ability to contribute to meeting a wide range of policy goals. We urge BEIS to set out a sustainable future for small-scale, low-carbon energy projects such as AD beyond 2019 to give reassurance to what is such a crucial industry for meeting climate goals in the UK. via ADBA

5. £40 million awarded to Councils for low emission buses


As part of the Clean Bus Technology Fund, which was launched in 2017, the Joint Air Quality Unit has today announced awards totalling £40 million to local authorities across the UK to support efforts to improve air quality in UK towns and cities. Using the money councils will be able to retrofit vehicles with technology to reduce tailpipe emissions of nitrogen dioxide. Although much of the recent in the vehicle sector has come on the OEM side, retrofitting buses to use biomethane as a vehicle fuel offers a carbon reduction and can help reduce air pollution.

Road transport is going to change dramatically over the next couple of decades – and we have to make sure that the bus industry is ready to benefit from those changes.

Above, you can see Nusrat Ghani MP beside one of Nottingham City Transport's biomethane buses.
via £40 million award for buses

We hope you found this week's anaerobic digestion news informative. Watch out for next week's news!

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Wednesday, February 07, 2018

What is a Manure Pond and How to Use Lagoon Biogas



So you want to know: What are Manure Ponds and How to Use the Lagoon Biogas which an unmixed lagoon produces naturally.

Definition of "What is a Manure Pond"

A farm manure pond or lagoon is a man-made outdoor earthen basin filled with animal waste.

They are created from the manure slurry, which is washed out from underneath animal pens and piped into the pond.

A foul smelling gas called biogas is produced, and the majority of the gas is methane.

Some farmers cover their manure ponds to capture the biogas, and reduce odours.

Image illustrates What are Manure Ponds and How to Use Lagoon Biogas.
A floating plastic membrane cover, which wll hold the gas until it is needed, and pipes to collect the gas, are all that is needed for the simplest systems.

The methane in the biogas can be used for heating and for generating electricity on the farm.

Other farmers go to great lengths to produce biogas in large tanks called digesters where they put manure and used bedding material from their barns.

Click image to enlarge

 However, to use the biogas from a simple manure pond can be worthwhile financially especially in warm climates, and will help reduce climate change by reducing damaging greenhouse gas (methane) emissions.

For more info go to https://anaerobic-digestion.com/clp