Friday, March 15, 2019

Sanitary Benefits of Installing an Anaerobic Digester System

The most obvious sanitary benefit of installing an anaerobic digester system is the improvements to toilet facilities in the households. Throughout China and other developing countries, where no sewer system is in place, toilet facilities are in simple shacks.

The toilet is generally a slot in the floor with either a pit underneath or alternatively a trough running to a storage pit behind the building.

In the case of a pit toilet, the slurry in the pit is often literally moving with insect larvae, and in all cases the toilets are smelly and fly infested. For these reasons, toilets are generally located as far away from the other household buildings as practical.

Watch our video below for a contrasting example of what one biogas plant supplier has achieved in sanitary improvement, using a biogas digester:

Biogas Digester Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool that can be used to compare the environmental impacts of different products throughout their entire life cycle (European Commission, 2010).

The LCA has been used to compare different biogas production technologies (Rehl and Muller, 2011; Poeschl et al., 2012a). Several studies have also focused on technologies for biogas production from manure and different co-substrates for manure (Hamelin et al., 2011; Rehl and Muller, 2011; De Vries et al., 2012; Poeschl et al., 2012a).

However, very few studies have focused on the vast number of small-scale biogas digesters being deployed in developing countries. Only one single study has been identified (Chen et al., 2012) and this study largely ignores the issues of CH4 leakage and release and nutrient recycling.

With the current UK calculating being done on the LCA impact of biogas production, it will soon become be easier to make comparisons with other fuels.

SimGas Biogas Systems

SimGas biogas systems are fully integrated farm solutions designed to reach millions of rural households in developing countries. Our systems enable rural households with livestock to use the manure from their livestock to generate clean fuel for cooking and organic fertiliser.

Digesters are arguably even better, though, when they're in poor or developing countries. According to the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions, small-scale anaerobic digesters like the one Porter and Mazur want to build on Everest are commonly used in rural communities to meet heating and cooking needs. China, for example, has an estimated 8 million anaerobic digesters. Nepal - where the one in question would be built - already has 50,000.

Toilet Facilities in the Households with Biogas Plants

The most obvious sanitary benefit of installing an anaerobic digester system is the improvements to toilet facilities in the households. Throughout China and other developing countries, where no sewer system is in place, toilet facilities are in simple shacks. The toilet is generally a slot in the floor with either a pit underneath or alternatively a trough running to a storage pit behind the building. In the case of a pit toilet, the slurry in the pit is often literally moving with insect larvae, and in all cases the toilets are smelly and fly infested. For these reasons, toilets are generally located as far away from the other household buildings as practical.

Reasons to Try Aquaponics

The world today uses epic amounts of non-renewable resources. as we grow old, our backs tend to give senior citizens trouble. Gardening is hard on the back. Aquaponic systems can be designed to ensure you never have to bend over to plant or harvest. lower cholesterol.

Many organizations and countries around the world are seeking to find new sustainable ways to produce food due to the world food crisis. Hydroponic and aquaponic systems have plenty of benefits for developing countries and make use of he output from digestion, known as digestate.

Unfortunately, the digested may still contain some diseases, especially when the digestate has been output after the source has been recognized as including some animal by-products.

The control of pests and diseases of plants grown in aquaponic systems is a problem since pesticide use is clearly limited by the high sensitivity of water pollution which may be caused by it.

In general, published data indicate that a digestion time of 14 days at 35 C is effective in killing (99.9 per cent die-off rate) the enteric bacterial pathogens and the enteric group of viruses. However, the die-off rate for roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) and hookworm (Ancylostoma) is only 90 per cent, which is still high. In this context, biogas production would provide a public health benefit beyond that of any other treatment in managing the rural health environment of developing countries.

Energy Shortages in Developed Countries

Energy shortages in developed countries turned out to have an impact on developing countries such as Indonesia (Simamora, 2006). The declining of the reserve natural energy and the increasing of human needs for living force them to always make effort and innovate to solve their problem.

A Substitute for Fossil Fuel Based Household Energy

Thumbnail image depicting the Sanitary Benefits of Installing an Anaerobic Digester System.

Any effort for a renewable substitute for fossil fuel based household energy is by developing biogas that have raw material from cattle manure. The biggest parts of Indonesia are rural area which have source income in form of integrated agriculture product, one of them is cattle, so the developing of Biogas is really potential. So far, Productivity and Socialization of Biogas energy in the countryside have not conferred maximal product outcomes.

Many developing countries, such as Colombia, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Vietnam, Cambodia, have promoted the low-cost biodigester technology aiming at reducing the production cost by using local materials and simplifying installation and operation (Botero and Preston 1987; Solarte 1995; Chater 1986; Sarwatt et al 1995; Soeurn 1994; Khan 1996).

The model used was a continuous-flow flexible tube biodigester based on the "red mud PVC" (Taiwan) bag design as described by Pound et al (1981) and later simplified by Preston and co-workers first in Ethiopia (Preston unpubl.), Colombia (Botero and Preston 1987) and later in Vietnam (Bui Xuan An et al 1994).

More than 7000 polyethylene biodigesters have been installed in Vietnam, mainly paid for by farmers (Bui Xuan An and Preston 1995).

Conclusion

Developing countries have struggled to supply stable forms of energy to many of their inhabitants.
According to the World Energy Outlook, approximately 80 percent of people without electricity live in rural areas in Sub-Saharan Africa and developing Asia.

With no other alternative for energy, many people already rely on biogas and struggle to efficiently transport and store it. The technology is therefore in a good position to be developed and extended.

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